Pacific Wellness Toronto News

Recipe: Cilantro Chimichurri

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by: EeVon Ling ND

Chimichurri is a traditional Argentinean marinade and dressing. I eat it with everything, from spreading it on sandwiches, dipping it with flatbread, drizzling it over salads, to even adding it to freshly cooked pasta or noodles. I would even eat it straight with a spoon, if I really wanted to. Not only is chimichurri a fresh and tasty addition to your meals, it has numerous health benefits too!

Cilantro is good for digestion and contains a compound that helps detoxify heavy metals and other toxins (perhaps good for counteracting the not-so-healthy charred parts of barbequed meat). It is also high in vitamins A and C (two important anti-oxidant vitamins that are good for skin and eyes), as well as vitamin E, numerous B vitamins (including folic acid), and many minerals (including calcium and magnesium).

Ingredients:
– Extra virgin olive oil (1/4 cup)
– Fresh lime juice (1/4 cup)
– Fresh Cilantro* (1 bunch, washed, coarsely chopped with stems and roots removed)
– Jalapeno pepper (1/2 – 1 whole, coarsely chopped with seeds and veins removed)
– Garlic (2 cloves minced)
– Sea salt (2 pinches)
– Black pepper for taste
– Cold water for consistency

Instructions:
Add olive oil, lime juice, garlic, and jalapeno to a blender or food processor. Blend while adding cilantro in small batches, then add sea salt and black pepper. If needed, cold water can be added, 1 tbsp at a time, while blending until desired consistency. Use immediately and refrigerate leftovers in an airtight container. This will keep in the fridge for 3 days. Stir any leftovers before using.

Makes 1 cup of chimichurri (total calories: 500)

* Did you know? Cilantro is something you either love or hate. Those who hate cilantro usually report that cilantro has a soapy or metallic taste. Apparently, this difference in taste perception may be genetic – a certain enzyme that is present or missing affects the way one tastes cilantro. In any case, regular parsley can be used instead of cilantro for this recipe.

Eevon Ling, ND is a licensed naturopathic doctor at The Pacific Wellness Institute.

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